Centennial Event – Beaverton, OR

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Date/Time
April 23, 2014
7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Location
Beaverton Library
12375 SW Fifth St.
Beaverton, OR

Open to the Public: Yes
Admission: No
Event Host(s): Annie Lewis
Featured Guest(s): Ethan Seltzer and Bruce Weber

Event Site Contact Info:
Name: Annie Lewis
Phone: 503 350-3617
Email: alewis@beavertonoregon.gov


Every state has a legacy of truths—stories residents tell to explain why things are how they are. When those truths conflict, as they inevitably do, the result is political, social, and cultural tension. In Oregon, tensions manifest themselves as wet versus dry, the valley versus the east side, and, perhaps most fundamental, urban versus rural. What are the ties that bind, or could bind, urban and rural communities to a common future? This is the focus of “Toward One Oregon: Bridging Oregon’s Urban and Rural Communities,” a free conversation with Ethan Seltzer and Bruce Weber on Wednesday, April 23rd at the Beaverton City Library, 12375 SW Fifth St, Beaverton, OR 97005, Meeting Rooms A & B.

Seltzer is a professor of urban studies and planning at Portland State University. Before joining PSU, he was the land use supervisor for Metro, served as an assistant to Portland City Commissioner Mike Lindberg, was the assistant director for the Southeast Uplift Neighborhood program in Portland, and created and directed a statewide coalition dedicated to improving drinking water quality monitoring and protection throughout Oregon.

Weber is a professor of agricultural and resource economics at Oregon State University and director of OSU’s Rural Studies Program. He does applied research and outreach and teaches graduate and undergraduate courses on rural community economics and policy.

Toward One Oregon is being offered by the Beaverton City Library and sponsored by the Beaverton Library Foundation as part of the 2014 Oregon Reads Program, recognizing Oregon Poet Laureate, William Stafford, and his writings of rural landscapes and the American west.

This program is made possible by the generous support of Oregon Humanities, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Oregon Cultural Trust.